Turkish Bread and Pastries

Adam, the Saint of Bakers, learned how to make a bread from the angel Gabriel. This secret is definitely known by the Turks. It’s not possible to find a bread that tastes like every day fresh Turkish bread or simit. It’s loved by all. Finding a Turk who doesn’t like Turkish bread is unthinkable. It […]

Adam, the Saint of Bakers, learned how to make a from the angel Gabriel. This secret is definitely known by the Turks. It’s not possible to find a that tastes like every day fresh or . It’s loved by all.

Simit
by Robyn Lee

Finding a Turk who doesn’t like bread is unthinkable. It doesn’t matter if they’re rich or poor, each Turk would break bread while they are on the way to from the bakery. , simit and pide should be eaten the same day that they are baked, and this is not hard because bakes bake fresh bread every morning. is so divine that cannot be thrown away. Leftover becomes meal for birds or for cats and dogs after mixing it with milk.

Börek is a family of baked or fried pastries made of a thin flaky known as yufka.



Börek
Sigara Böreği by Noema Pérez

It can be filled with , often feta, sirene or kashar ; minced or vegetables like potato or spinach. Homemade Börek is a for special occasions and requires great skill and patience. Su Böreği (Turkish lasagne), Sigara Böreği (Turkish cigar shaped ), Paçanga Böreği (fried with pastrami and kashar) and Siron (baked rolls with yogurt) are the most famous böreks.

Mantı
Mantı by Scott Dexter

Mantı, small dumplings of filled with a special mix, are eaten with generous serving of garlic yogurt and dash of melted butter and paprika.



Along with bread, is another staple of the Turkish kitchen. Depending on the local cuisine, it can contain meat or vegetables. It’s a in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth. may be a main course or accompanied by another .





Photo Credits: DL Duncan




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